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Tickled Pink by Union Donation

Poverty Bay Rugby Football Union yesterday donated nearly $7000 to Hospice Tairawhiti from the online auction of special pink jerseys worn in a famous Heartland Championship victory last year.

In the last game of round-robin play against Horowhenua Kapiti, the Bay wore pink jerseys and socks as an acknowledgement to “women in rugby”.

Miah Nikora, assistant coach at the time and now the Heartland squad head coach, said whānau members presented the jerseys to the players the day of the match.

“The boys loved it and it was well-received by the families as well,” he said.

Union chief executive Josh Willoughby said after a tough 2020, they thought of doing something special in 2021.

“We came up with a plan to auction off the jerseys for charity so we put them up on Trade Me days before the match and bidding did get competitive,” he said.

All 22 jerseys were auctioned and the highest bid ($1000) went to the No.7 jersey of Stefan Destounis.

The match itself was memorable, with the Bay coming from 15-30 down to win 34-33 with a try in the 84th minute.

Mr Willoughby said the union saw itself as a community organisation.

“We are trying to show our players in our rugby community that there is value in what we do and value in the jersey.

“Hospice Tairāwhiti has played an incredible role for a number of our people . . . it is an organisation that is here for everyone so we thought it was a fitting recipient for it,” he said.

Hospice Tairāwhiti general manager Barbara Grout said the rugby team reached out to them last year and she was surprised and delighted by the “generous amount” raised from the auction.

“We feel very privileged that they have chosen us over many other suitable charities out there.”

The donation will be used for “finishing touches” to Hospice Tairāwhiti’s new building on the Gisborne Hospital grounds.

Poverty Bay Rugby Football Union yesterday donated nearly $7000 to Hospice Tairawhiti from the online auction of special pink jerseys worn in a famous Heartland Championship victory last year.

In the last game of round-robin play against Horowhenua Kapiti, the Bay wore pink jerseys and socks as an acknowledgement to “women in rugby”.

Miah Nikora, assistant coach at the time and now the Heartland squad head coach, said whānau members presented the jerseys to the players the day of the match.

“The boys loved it and it was well-received by the families as well,” he said.

Union chief executive Josh Willoughby said after a tough 2020, they thought of doing something special in 2021.

“We came up with a plan to auction off the jerseys for charity so we put them up on Trade Me days before the match and bidding did get competitive,” he said.

All 22 jerseys were auctioned and the highest bid ($1000) went to the No.7 jersey of Stefan Destounis.

The match itself was memorable, with the Bay coming from 15-30 down to win 34-33 with a try in the 84th minute.

Mr Willoughby said the union saw itself as a community organisation.

“We are trying to show our players in our rugby community that there is value in what we do and value in the jersey.

“Hospice Tairāwhiti has played an incredible role for a number of our people . . . it is an organisation that is here for everyone so we thought it was a fitting recipient for it,” he said.

Hospice Tairāwhiti general manager Barbara Grout said the rugby team reached out to them last year and she was surprised and delighted by the “generous amount” raised from the auction.

“We feel very privileged that they have chosen us over many other suitable charities out there.”

The donation will be used for “finishing touches” to Hospice Tairāwhiti’s new building on the Gisborne Hospital grounds.

Poverty Bay Rugby Football Union yesterday donated nearly $7000 to Hospice Tairawhiti from the online auction of special pink jerseys worn in a famous Heartland Championship victory last year.

In the last game of round-robin play against Horowhenua Kapiti, the Bay wore pink jerseys and socks as an acknowledgement to “women in rugby”.

Miah Nikora, assistant coach at the time and now the Heartland squad head coach, said whānau members presented the jerseys to the players the day of the match.

“The boys loved it and it was well-received by the families as well,” he said.

Union chief executive Josh Willoughby said after a tough 2020, they thought of doing something special in 2021.

“We came up with a plan to auction off the jerseys for charity so we put them up on Trade Me days before the match and bidding did get competitive,” he said.

All 22 jerseys were auctioned and the highest bid ($1000) went to the No.7 jersey of Stefan Destounis.

The match itself was memorable, with the Bay coming from 15-30 down to win 34-33 with a try in the 84th minute.

Mr Willoughby said the union saw itself as a community organisation.

“We are trying to show our players in our rugby community that there is value in what we do and value in the jersey.

“Hospice Tairāwhiti has played an incredible role for a number of our people . . . it is an organisation that is here for everyone so we thought it was a fitting recipient for it,” he said.

Hospice Tairāwhiti general manager Barbara Grout said the rugby team reached out to them last year and she was surprised and delighted by the “generous amount” raised from the auction.

“We feel very privileged that they have chosen us over many other suitable charities out there.”

The donation will be used for “finishing touches” to Hospice Tairāwhiti’s new building on the Gisborne Hospital grounds.

Poverty Bay Rugby Football Union yesterday donated nearly $7000 to Hospice Tairawhiti from the online auction of special pink jerseys worn in a famous Heartland Championship victory last year.

In the last game of round-robin play against Horowhenua Kapiti, the Bay wore pink jerseys and socks as an acknowledgement to “women in rugby”.

Miah Nikora, assistant coach at the time and now the Heartland squad head coach, said whānau members presented the jerseys to the players the day of the match.

“The boys loved it and it was well-received by the families as well,” he said.

Union chief executive Josh Willoughby said after a tough 2020, they thought of doing something special in 2021.

“We came up with a plan to auction off the jerseys for charity so we put them up on Trade Me days before the match and bidding did get competitive,” he said.

All 22 jerseys were auctioned and the highest bid ($1000) went to the No.7 jersey of Stefan Destounis.

The match itself was memorable, with the Bay coming from 15-30 down to win 34-33 with a try in the 84th minute.

Mr Willoughby said the union saw itself as a community organisation.

“We are trying to show our players in our rugby community that there is value in what we do and value in the jersey.

“Hospice Tairāwhiti has played an incredible role for a number of our people . . . it is an organisation that is here for everyone so we thought it was a fitting recipient for it,” he said.

Hospice Tairāwhiti general manager Barbara Grout said the rugby team reached out to them last year and she was surprised and delighted by the “generous amount” raised from the auction.

“We feel very privileged that they have chosen us over many other suitable charities out there.”

The donation will be used for “finishing touches” to Hospice Tairāwhiti’s new building on the Gisborne Hospital grounds.

Poverty Bay Rugby Football Union yesterday donated nearly $7000 to Hospice Tairawhiti from the online auction of special pink jerseys worn in a famous Heartland Championship victory last year.

In the last game of round-robin play against Horowhenua Kapiti, the Bay wore pink jerseys and socks as an acknowledgement to “women in rugby”.

Miah Nikora, assistant coach at the time and now the Heartland squad head coach, said whānau members presented the jerseys to the players the day of the match.

“The boys loved it and it was well-received by the families as well,” he said.

Union chief executive Josh Willoughby said after a tough 2020, they thought of doing something special in 2021.

“We came up with a plan to auction off the jerseys for charity so we put them up on Trade Me days before the match and bidding did get competitive,” he said.

All 22 jerseys were auctioned and the highest bid ($1000) went to the No.7 jersey of Stefan Destounis.

The match itself was memorable, with the Bay coming from 15-30 down to win 34-33 with a try in the 84th minute.

Mr Willoughby said the union saw itself as a community organisation.

“We are trying to show our players in our rugby community that there is value in what we do and value in the jersey.

“Hospice Tairāwhiti has played an incredible role for a number of our people . . . it is an organisation that is here for everyone so we thought it was a fitting recipient for it,” he said.

Hospice Tairāwhiti general manager Barbara Grout said the rugby team reached out to them last year and she was surprised and delighted by the “generous amount” raised from the auction.

“We feel very privileged that they have chosen us over many other suitable charities out there.”

The donation will be used for “finishing touches” to Hospice Tairāwhiti’s new building on the Gisborne Hospital grounds.